Posts Tagged ‘Women’

Eat, Pray, Love: One Woman’s Search for Everything Across Italy, India and Indonesia

Tuesday, November 23rd, 2010

Eat, Pray, Love: One Woman's Search for Everything Across Italy, India and IndonesiaEat, Pray, Love: One Woman’s Search for Everything Across Italy, India and Indonesia by Elizabeth Gilbert really motivated me to meditate more. I had a strong desire to go to a meditation camp where all I’ll do is cleanse myself and meditate. Then I will be ready to come back recharged to enjoy this beautiful world more thoroughly. In fact, we used to do that when Shri Mataji used to arrange a week of meditation seminar in Ganapatipule in India. I surely do miss that.

It was fascinating for me to read the “Pray” part of the book as Elizabeth Gilbert has iterated most of the knowledge of Sahaja Yoga. She did a great job explaining what Yoga is and also, she did an amazing job at dispelling the myth about Yoga. Anybody who is inquisitive about meditation must read this book.

Snow Flower and the Secret Fan

Tuesday, May 8th, 2007

Snow Flower and the Secret FanI just couldn’t put down Snow Flower and the Secret FanSnow Flower and the Secret Fan by Lisa See. I read this book in three days. Chinese domestic life in nineteenth century is so intriguing. I thank God that I didn’t have to bear the torment of footbinding. Also, the concept of laotong is interesting. All of us need a friend who is like a sister or a brother and with whom we can share most of our inner thoughts.

Although the story is set in the nineteenth century China, it seems to be an in-depth inspection of the temperament of all women in general. I think I’m kind of like Lily and so, it was interesting for me to learn about her shortcomings. It led me to introspect. The history of nu shu (“women’s writing”) is enchanting.

The Heart of a Woman

Saturday, February 24th, 2007

I felt that Maya Angelou in “The Heart of a WomanThe Heart of a Woman” has indeed opened her heart to the reader. She seems to be honestly revealing her feelings without any fear of being judged. I don’t know how do people like her are able to write an autobiography with such honesty. I don’t think I can do that. Hence, she has won my admiration. I plan to read rest of the series of her autobiography eventually.

This is the first time I read about struggle against racism from an activist’s perspective. It’s fascinating. Also, it’s amusing to learn about the expectations of an African husband, Vusumji Make. It sounds same as Indian husbands especially during that era. It’s inconceivable to know that Dr. Angelou’s had to sit through the palaver to find out if she was right to leave her husband or not. Above all, her dynamic, enterprising and versatile personality has left in awe.

The Secret Life of Bees

Wednesday, February 7th, 2007

Following encouraging words from “The Secret Life of BeesThe Secret Life of Bees” by Sue Monk Kidd are so accurate: “You have to find a mother inside yourself. We all do. Even if we already have a mother, we still have to find this part of ourselves inside.” That’s insightful.

This is a very sweet story about a 14 year old Lily Owens. I admired the character of August Boatwright as she is intelligent and full of wisdom. Also, I learnt a lot about bees. While reading this novel I had a craving for honey. So, I recommend buying a bottle of honey before you start reading this novel.

A Tree Grows in Brooklyn

Monday, December 18th, 2006

I enjoyed reading “A Tree Grows in BrooklynA Tree Grows in Brooklyn” by Betty Smith. I lived in Brooklyn for three years. Hence I felt an instant connection and was attracted to this novel as soon as I read the title. What a courageous story! I think highly of the characters of Katie Nolan and Francie Nolan. Aunt Sissy was my favorite character as she made me laugh a lot.

The story demonstrates that with education we can conquer poverty. Education is a necessity to improve our standard of living. Education can give us wisdom that can empower our character. It’s a classic for all ages.